25 April, 2018 | 9 Sha’ban, 1439 H

"A man who sits with his family is more beloved to Allah (swt) than spending the night in worship (itikaf) in my masjid"

- The Prophet Muhammad (s)

Learning
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Core Curriculum

Section 1 - God, Religion and Islam: An Introduction
  • Topic 1.1 - The Problem of Evil, Suffering and Pain

  • Topic 1.2 - God, Allah and Religion

  • Topic 1.3 - Introduction to Islam

  • Topic 1.4 - What is “Religion” and What’s the Point of it Anyways?

  • Topic 1.5 - A Brief Introduction to the Prophet Muhammad (s), the Prophet of Islam

Section 2 - Foundations of Islam - Theology
  • Topic 2.1 - Entering Islam: The Shahada

  • Topic 2.2 - The Usūl al-Dīn: The Fundamental Beliefs of Islam

  • Topic 2.3 - Tawhīd: The Unity and Oneness of God in Islam

  • Topic 2.4 - Adala: Divine Justice in Islam

  • Topic 2.5 - Nubuwwa: The Purpose of Prophethood in Islam

  • Topic 2.6 - Imāmah or divinely guided leadership in Islam after the Prophet Muhammad.

  • Topic 2.7 - Maʿād: The Day of Judgment in Islam

  • Topic 2.8 - The Sharīʿa: Purpose and Practice

  • Topic 2.9 - The Islamic Concept of the Nafs: Battling the Human Ego

  • Topic 2.10 - Satan, Jinns and Angels: Their Influence in the World

  • Topic 2.11 - The Problem of Evil, Suffering and Pain

Section 3 - Foundations of Islam - Obligatory Acts
  • Topic 3.1 - Accepting Islam: Putting Faith into Action

  • Topic 3.2 - Jihād in Islamic Law and Spirituality

  • Topic 3.3 - Salāt: Obligatory Ritual Prayers in Islam

  • Topic 3.4 - Ritual Purity in Islamic Law: Understanding Tahāra and Najāsa

  • Topic 3.5 - The Five Categories of Islamic Law

  • Topic 3.6 - Tawalla and Tabarra, its Basics and Purpose

  • Topic 3.7 - The Purpose of Zakat and Khums in Islamic Law

  • Topic 3.8 - The Hajj Pilgrimage

  • Topic 3.9 - The Furūʿ al-Dīn: The Fundamental Practices of Islam

  • Topic 3.10 - Fasting in Islam, its Purpose, Dos and Don’ts

  • Topic 3.11 - Other Obligatory and Forbidden Acts in Islam

  • Topic 3.12 - Niyya: Religious Intention as the Foundation of Islamic Practice

  • Topic 3.13 - Commanding the Good and Forbidding Evil in Islam

Section 4 - Prophethood in Islam
  • Topic 4.1 - A Brief Biography of the Prophet Muhammad (s): The Prophet’s Childhood (PART I of III)

  • Topic 4.2 - Bio: The Prophet Muhammad as a Prophet of God (PART II of III)

  • Topic 4.3 - A Brief Biography of the Prophet Muhammad (s): The Prophet’s Character (PART III of III)

  • Topic 4.4 - The Prophet Muhammad (s) as Messenger and Teacher

  • Topic 4.5 - The Prophet and his Relationships

  • Topic 4.6 - The Prophet’s Sunnah and Hadith

  • Topic 4.7 - Ghadīr and Arafah: The Two Last Sermons of the Prophet

  • Topic 4.8 - Jesus and Mary in Islam

Section 5 - The Qur'an and Hadith
  • Topic 5.1 - Islam and Other Religions

  • Topic 5.2 - What is the Qur’an? A Short Introduction to Islam’s Holy Book

  • Topic 5.3 - The Structure of the Holy Qur’an

  • Topic 5.4 - The Quran and Islamic law

  • Topic 5.5 - The Qur’an, Allah and Humankind

  • Topic 5.6 - Hadith and Sunnah, difference and variations

  • Topic 5.7 - The Reliability of Hadiths

  • Topic 5.8 - A Reflection on Verses of the Holy Qur’an

  • Topic 5.9 - Hadith al-Thaqalayn

  • Topic 5.10 - Imam Ali (as) and Nahj al-Balagha.

  • Topic 5.11 - Taqlid and Tawḍih Al Masail Genre of Literature

Section 6 - Measuring Good and Bad in Islam
  • Topic 6.1 - The Effects of Our Actions in this World

  • Topic 6.2 - The Gray Areas of Islamic Law and Morality

  • Topic 6.3 - Heaven and Hell in Islam

  • Topic 6.4 - Life and Death in Islam

  • Topic 6.5 - Guidance According to Islam

  • Topic 6.6 - Fate and the Consequences of our Choices in Islam

  • Topic 6.7 - The Effect of Culture and Environment in Shaping our Religious Choices

  • Topic 6.8 - Major Sins in Islam

  • Topic 6.9 - Why Allah Allows People to Sin

  • Topic 6.10 - Repentance and Forgiveness of Sins in Islam

  • Topic 6.11 - The Three Kinds of Rights in Islam

  • Topic 6.12 - Sinning Against Others and their Delayed Punishment

  • Topic 6.13 - Kufr in Islam

  • Topic 6.14 - Trivializing the Harām

  • Topic 6.15 - Benefits of Islamic Law in this World

  • Topic 6.16 - Good and Bad Deeds: The Spiritual Consequences of our Choices

Section 7 - The Legacy of the Prophet Muhammad (s) and his Ahl al-Bayt (as)
  • Topic 7.1 - Islam and Knowledge: the Importance of Islamic Education

  • Topic 7.2 - The Ahl al-Kisa

  • Topic 7.3 - Imamah in the Qur’an

  • Topic 7.4 - Fatima al-Zahrah (as)

  • Topic 7.5 - A Brief Look at the Lives of the Imams (Imam al-Hasan until Imam Muhammad al-Baqir)

  • Topic 7.6 - A Brief Look at the Lives of the Imams (Imam Jafar al-Sadiq until Imam Hasan al-Askari)

  • Topic 7.7 - A Brief Look at the Life and Importance of Imam al-Mahdi (aj)

  • Topic 7.8 - Salawat and Atonement in Islam

  • Topic 7.9 - The Companions (Sahaba) of the Prophet According to the Qur’an

  • Topic 7.10 - Clerical Hierarchies in Muslim Communities

  • Topic 7.11 - Mosques in Islam

  • Topic 7.12 - The Philosophy of Karbala and Majalis

  • Topic 7.13 - A Brief Biography of Imam Ali ibn Abi Talib (as)

  • Topic 7.14 - The Battle of Karbala: A Brief History

Section 8 - Islamic Relationships, Sects and Conflicts
  • Topic 8.1 - Misconceptions about Shi’ism

  • Topic 8.2 - Major Sects of Islam

  • Topic 8.3 - Islam and Religious Conflicts

  • Topic 8.4 - Islam and Rights

  • Topic 8.5 - Sunnism and Shi’ism, beginnings and historical developments.

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Special Topics

Section 9 - Independent Topics
  • Topic 9.1 - Muslim Converts – Welcome to Islam!

  • Topic 9.2 - Basic Dos and Don’ts of Being a Muslim

  • Topic 9.3 - Halal Food and Zabiha

  • Topic 9.4 - Family, Parents and Marriage in Islam

  • Topic 9.5 - Marriage in Islam

  • Topic 9.6 - Islam and Sex

  • Topic 9.7 - Modesty in Islam

  • Topic 9.8 - Women’s Menstruation in Islam

  • Topic 9.9 - Music, Alcohol, Drugs and Pork in Islam

  • Topic 9.10 - Islam and Science

  • Topic 9.11 - A Reading List of Islamic Knowledge

  • Topic 9.13 - Ritual Prayers and Supplications in Islam

  • Topic 9.14 - Death & Burial Rituals in Islam

  • Topic 9.15 - The Battle of Armageddon: An Islamic View

  • Topic 9.16 - The Muslim Calendar

  • Topic 9.17 - Muslims and non-Muslims in the Shariah

  • Topic 9.18 - A Timeline of Major Events in Islamic History

  • Topic 9.19 - Introducing the Qur’an: Why it is the way it is

  • Topic 9.20 - The School of Imam Jafar al-Sadiq

  • Topic 9.21 - Major Fields in Islamic Studies

  • Topic 9.22 - The Caliphate in Sunni and Shia Islam

  • Topic 9.24 - Islam, Racism and Anti-Semitism

Section 10 - Islam, Religion, and Modern Controversies
  • Topic 10.1 - Modern Fallacies about God: where Theists and Atheists Agree

  • Topic 10.2 - Tawhīd: The Muslim God according to the Prophet Muhammad and the Ahl al-Bayt (as)

  • Topic 10.3 - God’s Existence: The Argument From Being (Wujūd)

  • Topic 10.4 - God’s Existence: The Kalam Cosmological Argument

  • Topic 10.5 - God’s Existence: The Argument From Design

  • Topic 10.6 - The Problem of Evil, Suffering and Pain

  • Topic 10.7 - Why did God Create Us? The Purpose of our Creation

  • Topic 10.8 - Why Humans Need Religion according to Islam

  • Topic 10.9 - Jahl and Spiritual Ignorance in Islam

  • Topic 10.11 - Do Non-Muslims Go to Hell?

Music, Alcohol, Drugs and Pork in Islam

Abstract

Islam is the strictest of all religions when it comes to the vices of alcohol, drugs, music and pork. Islam views them as spiritually polluting and to be abstained from. 

INTRODUCTION 

 

Bismillāhir Rahmānir Rahīm, As-salāmu ʿAlaykum wa rahmatullāhi wa barakātuh. Peace be upon you brothers and sisters. 

 

Welcome back to the Muslim Converts Channel! 

 

We all know what goes on in parties even if we’ve never been in them. These parties usually have five things: music, alcohol, drugs, fornication and eating pork. In Abrahamic traditions, many of these things are considered vices, or at the very least, inadequate use of them are vices. Islam is by far the strictest when it comes to their prohibition. 

 

In this lesson, we will look into Islam’s position on these five vices and when adequate, make comparisons between Islam’s position and that of other Abrahamic religions. 

 

BODY OF TEXT 

 

O you who have believed, indeed, intoxicants, gambling, [sacrificing on] stone alters [to other than Allah ], and divining arrows are but defilement from the work of Satan, so avoid it that you may be successful. Satan only wants to cause between you animosity and hatred through intoxicants and gambling and to avert you from the remembrance of Allah and from prayer. So will you not desist? And obey Allah and obey the Messenger and beware. And if you turn away - then know that upon Our Messenger is only [the responsibility for] clear notification. (Chapter 5, verses 90 to 92 of the Holy Qur’an) 

 

Music 

 

Music is part of every culture in the world. It is simply universal without any exception. Despite its prevalence, Islam has misgivings about music. Although some of it may have some therapeutic elements, Islam also believes that it can be destructive in influence.  

 

Music has a tendency to inflame our passions. They can make us sad, happy, angry, depressed or courageous. They can either make us want to do good for people, or hurt them in some way. In sum, music has an immense influence over our moods and emotions which can cloud our minds.  

 

This is not to mention the problematic lyrics that some songs have. With seductive beats, music can warp our sense of morality with lyrics we would not accept if the beats weren’t there. 

 

For these reasons, Islam is very cautious when it comes to music and may forbid a lot of it. In order to know more about Islam’s position on the subject, please make sure to contact your Marja or resident scholar at a Masjid near you to learn more about music and Islamic law. 

 

Alcohol 

 

Christianity and Judaism allow alcohol. Alcohol is often used in religious rituals and ceremonies. Just because these religions condone alcohol does not mean that they endorse over consumption of it.  

 

Islam’s position on alcohol is stricter. Not even a single drop of alcohol is permitted in Islam. This is so for multiple reasons. 

 

  1.  Alcohol is one of those substances that often has its limits stretched by its consumers. Thinking that they can control themselves, many people go over the border and get drunk. As a result of their drunkenness, they say or do many shameful acts which they otherwise wouldn’t do in a normal state. Islam therefore has a zero tolerance policy. Just like a red light, everyone has to obey the rules, no exceptions! 
  2.  Alcohol is ritually impure in Islam. This means that its consumption pollutes the human soul and makes it impermissible for a person to enter into prayer while in a state of drunkenness. The ritual impurity itself, which can come about even with a drop, is considered poisonous to the health of the human soul. 
  3.  The Qur’an does see some benefits in alcohol, but it says that its harms outweigh its good. But the Qur’an’s main central argument is that alcohol causes heedlessness and forgetfulness of God. So pay attention: the #1 reason why Islam forbids alcohol is because of its negative effects on the soul. 

 

Alcohol is only permissible in Islam under times of extreme duress. For example, if you find yourself dying of thirst in the middle of a desert and all you have is a bottle of alcohol, then according to Islam it is permissible to drink alcohol and even obligatory in order to save your life. 

 

Drugs 

 

Drugs are not explicitly mentioned in the Qur’an. However, there are some general principals in the hadith literature that makes any kind of recreational drug impermissible. The hadiths state that all forms of intoxicants and things which get us out of our normal state of minds (or aql) are forbidden. 

 

This means that cocaine, heroin and even marijuana are forbidden in Islam. The question of pain killer drugs, like morphine, Vicodin or even medical marijuna are a different matter. Although these drugs can cause highs and interfere with our normal states of thinking, they can be taken if they are prescribed by a doctor for serious health reasons.  

 

If one just wants to feel good with the drugs and go on a high, then it is forbidden. 

 

Fornication 

 

Fornication or zina is also forbidden in Islam. Fornication is generally understood as intimate relations outside of marriage. Traditionally speaking, Abrahamic societies considered this to be a vice for many reasons. For one, it eroded the institution of marriage which is necessary for proper parenthood and healthy and stable societies. 

 

Second, intimate relations outside the proper bounds that are set by God lead to spiritual corruption. As Islam and Christianity teach, fornication and adultery open up spiritual wounds by which demons or evil jinn can enter us. These demons can wreck havoc in our hearts and minds and distance us from God. 

 

Pork 

 

Pork is a specific dietary vice in Islam, Judaism and early Christianity. Islam believes that certain kinds of foods can be spiritually polluting even if they don’t intoxicate us. Pork, like alcohol, is ritually impure. For this reason, and perhaps others, it is forbidden to eat as it has a detrimental affect on our souls even if we don’t perceive it directly. 

 

CONCLUSION 

 

 Being a Muslim isn’t always easy, especially if your converting to it. Here are a list of vices that people need to abstain from when they convert to Islam: 

 

Music 

 

Islam is very cautious when it comes to music and may forbid most kinds as it has a way to encourage sin. In order to know more about Islam’s position on the subject, please make sure to contact your Marja or resident scholar at a Masjid near you to learn more about music and Islamic law. 

 

 Alcohol 

 

Islam’s position on alcohol is the strictest of all religions. Not even a single drop of alcohol is permitted in Islam. 

 

 Drugs 

 

Drugs are not explicitly mentioned in the Qur’an. However, there are some general principals in the hadith literature that makes any kind of recreational drug impermissible. The hadiths state that all forms of intoxicants and things which get us out of our normal state of minds ( or aql) are forbidden. 

 

Fornication 

 

Fornication or zina is also forbidden in Islam. Fornication is generally understood as intimacy outside of marriage. Traditionally speaking, Abrahamic societies considered this to be a vice. 

 

Pork 

 

Pork is a specific dietary vice in Islam, Judaism and early Christianity. Islam believes that certain kinds of foods can be spiritually polluting even if they don’t intoxicate us. Pork, like alcohol, is ritually impure.

Aql

intellect, mind 

Q1

Is all music forbidden in Islam?

Islam is very cautious when it comes to music. If you want to know if all music is forbidden in Islam, please refer to your Marja. 

Q2

Why is alcohol forbidden in Islam?

Because it causes heedlessness of God and pollutes the human soul 

 

Q3

Can I drink a small cup of beer if it doesn’t cause drunkenness in me?

No, not even a single drop is permissible. 

 

Q4

Are mind altering drugs permitted in Islam?

The only mind altering drugs that are permissible in Islam are those that are prescribed by a doctor and necessary for health reasons. 

 

Q5

Under what circumstances can I drink alcohol or eat pork in Islam?

  If you are dying of hunger or thirst

islam’s position on alcohol
music
aql
zina
ritually impure
Abrahamic religions
fornication

The Status of Music in Islam by Saleem Bhimji 

Alcohol by Akhtar Rizvi