19 June, 2018 | 5 Shawwal, 1439 H

"Silence saves you from regret"

- Imam Ali (as)

Full Videos

Core Curriculum

1 God, Religion and Islam: An Introduction

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1.1 The Problem of Evil, Suffering and Pain The problem of evil is the greatest challenge to faith in God. This lesson attempts to answer both the intellectual and emotional problems of evil. Read More


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1.2 God, Allah and Religion Are God and Allah the same? What are the characteristics of God in Islam? Here we look at the attributes of the Muslim God and His relationship to humankind. Read More


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1.3 Introduction to Islam Islam is the second largest religion in the world. In this lesson, we look at the basic beliefs and facts of Islam, including the purpose of divinely revealed religions and submission to God. Read More


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1.4 What is “Religion” and What’s the Point of it Anyways?  We look over the controversies on the various definitions of religion and its related function. We briefly introduce Islam’s definition of the term.   Read More


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1.5 A Brief Introduction to the Prophet Muhammad (s), the Prophet of Islam Here we briefly look at the Prophet Muhammad’s (s) cultural background and the circumstances in which the Qur’an was revealed in.  Read More


2 Foundations of Islam - Theology

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2.1 Entering Islam: The Shahada The shahāda is the Muslim testimony to faith. It is a witnessing to a fact and not just a belief. By uttering it, a person enters Islam.  By acknowledging that there is only one God who is worthy of worship and that Muhammad is His messenger, it is supposed to lead to a new way of life. Read More


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2.2 The Usūl al-Dīn: The Fundamental Beliefs of Islam The usūl al-dīn, or the fundamental beliefs of Islam, are the foundational principles that necessarily come after the shahāda. Belief in them are needed in order for one’s Islam to be complete and in line with God’s purpose when He revealed Islam.  Read More


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2.3 Tawhīd: The Unity and Oneness of God in Islam Tawhīd is the Absolute Oneness and Unity of God. It is the foundation of Islam and its most important doctrine. Without it, none of Islam makes sense since all beliefs are predicated upon it. Read More


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2.4 Adala: Divine Justice in Islam  ʿAdāla is divine justice in Islam. ʿAdāla stems from God’s Goodness, which is part of His essence. The God of Islam makes ʿadāla obligatory upon Himself out of His own goodness and makes it obligatory upon humankind. ʿAdāla is a balance, which means that if it is transgressed, it will lead to corruption and thus spiritual and material corruption. Read More


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2.5 Nubuwwa: The Purpose of Prophethood in Islam Prophethood in Islam is necessary for human salvation. Prophets provide humans with the blueprint or constitution for salvation in this world and in the Afterlife. Prophets are also role models that show us how to put this blueprint into action.  Read More


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2.6 Imāmah or divinely guided leadership in Islam after the Prophet Muhammad. Divinely guided leadership in Islam where Imāms are appointed by Allah to guide humankind and protect the correct interpretation of Islam after the death of the Prophet(s). It is also a spiritual form of guidance where an Imām does not need to be directly present but guides humankind through his light. Imāmah, as understood by Shiʿa Islam, is the primary difference between Shiʿa and Sunni Islam. Read More


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2.7 Maʿād: The Day of Judgment in Islam The nature of the Day of Judgment in Islam. When it begins, how we will be judged, and how we can be saved. The Day of Judgment is the culmination of all the other usūl al-dīn. Read More


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2.8 The Sharīʿa: Purpose and Practice Sharīʿa literally means “way” or “road” as in a way of life towards God. The purpose of the Sharīʿa is to discipline and test mankind in its obedience to God. Only through obedience to Allah can we reach salvation and closeness to Him. Read More


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2.9 The Islamic Concept of the Nafs: Battling the Human Ego Here we discuss the nature of our “base self” or “base ego” called the nafs. There is a battle raging inside, one for good and the other for evil. Whichever one wins depends on whichever one we feed the most.  Read More


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2.10 Satan, Jinns and Angels: Their Influence in the World An outlook on the different kinds of spiritual beings that influence our minds and hearts. The two major ones are  Jinns and Angels. They both act in the battlegrounds of our inner selves and try to influence us for good or evil. Read More


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2.11 The Problem of Evil, Suffering and Pain The problem of evil is the greatest challenge to faith in God. This lesson attempts to answer both the intellectual and emotional problems of evil. Read More


3 Foundations of Islam - Obligatory Acts

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3.1 Accepting Islam: Putting Faith into Action Islam is not just a religion of belief, but it is equally a religion of action. Without action and good works, one cannot be a Muslim. The two come together in ensuring the salvation of a person. Read More


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3.2 Jihād in Islamic Law and Spirituality The are two kinds of Jihad in Islam, one minor and the other major. The minor jihad is a war of self-defense against hostile powers. The major jihad is a struggle against one’s evil desires.  Read More


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3.3 Salāt: Obligatory Ritual Prayers in Islam The five obligatory ritual prayers or salāt are the foundations of both Islamic practice and belief. Salāt is the primary means through which a relationship between a person and God is established. Without salāt, there is no Islam. Read More


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3.4 Ritual Purity in Islamic Law: Understanding Tahāra and Najāsa This is an introduction to the basic meaning and function of ritual purity (tahāra) and impurity (najāsa, janāba) in Islam and the basic practices that bring about states of purity. These are necessary for performing ritual duties like prayer. Read More


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3.5 The Five Categories of Islamic Law The five categories of action in Islamic law. These are wājib, mustahab, mubāh, makrūh, and harām. These acts are there to guide our lives and set boundaries so that we may have healthy spiritual lives. Read More


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3.6 Tawalla and Tabarra, its Basics and Purpose Tawalla is love for the Prophet (s) and his Ahl al-Bayt (as). Tabarra is disassociation from their enemies. These two principles of the furūʿ al-dīn give Muslims the measure between right and wrong association. They are central for any proper action in Islam.  Read More


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3.7 The Purpose of Zakat and Khums in Islamic Law The two obligatory forms of charity in Islam, zakat and khums, are part of the furūʿ al-dīn in Islamic law. These are meant to help the poor and sustain religious institutions at a grassroots level.  Read More


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3.8 The Hajj Pilgrimage The Hajj pilgrimage is the most important pilgrimage in Islam. It is obligatory once in a Muslim’s lifetime. It is meant to reacquaint people with God and break tribal and geographic lines while promoting equality among all Muslims.  Read More


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3.9 The Furūʿ al-Dīn: The Fundamental Practices of Islam The Furūʿ al-Dīn: the fundamental core practices of Islam that all Muslims must heed after believing in Islam and accepting the usūl al-dīn.   Read More


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3.10 Fasting in Islam, its Purpose, Dos and Don’ts Fasting during the Holy Month of Ramadan is the most important Islamic practice after the obligatory salāt. The purpose of fasting is to instill God-consciousness and empathy with the poor.   Read More


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3.11 Other Obligatory and Forbidden Acts in Islam Here we take a look at ten other important obligations and prohibitions in Islam that are not explicitly in the furūʿ al-dīn. This lesson explains how they play a critical role in maintaining Islam. Islam is a system held by pillars, and all obligations and prohibitions act as pillars. Read More


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3.12 Niyya: Religious Intention as the Foundation of Islamic Practice Niyya is intention. Good niyya is performing an action whilst wanting to gain closeness to God. Bad niyya is performing a religious action or duty for something other than God.  Read More


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3.13 Commanding the Good and Forbidding Evil in Islam Commanding the Good and Forbidding Evil (Amr bi al-Maʿrūf and Nahī ʿan al-Munkar) are the 7th and 8th items of the Furūʿ al-Dīn. As social duties, Muslims must enjoin what God has deemed good and discourage what He has deemed as evil. Read More


4 Prophethood in Islam

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4.1 A Brief Biography of the Prophet Muhammad (s): The Prophet’s Childhood (PART I of III) Here we briefly look at the life of the Prophet Muhammad (s) and the qualities that distinguished him as a Prophet of God. This is part I of the biography. Read More


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4.2 Bio: The Prophet Muhammad as a Prophet of God (PART II of III) Here we briefly look at the life of the Prophet Muhammad (s) and the qualities that distinguished him as a Prophet of God. This is part I of the biography. Read More


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4.3 A Brief Biography of the Prophet Muhammad (s): The Prophet’s Character (PART III of III) Here we briefly look at the life of the Prophet Muhammad (s) and the qualities that distinguished him as a Prophet of God. This is part I of the biography. Read More


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4.4 The Prophet Muhammad (s) as Messenger and Teacher The role of the Prophet Muhammad (s) as a Messenger and Teacher. As a teacher, the Prophet Muhammad (s) guided people through compassion and teaching, not forcing them to believe.  Read More


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4.5 The Prophet and his Relationships This lesson looks at the Prophet’s relationship with God, his Progeny, the Islamic community and his companions and how these demonstrate his nature as the perfect man of God.  Read More


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4.6 The Prophet’s Sunnah and Hadith This lesson is an introduction to the meaning and importance of Sunnah and Hadith. It also introduces some of the different originators of hadiths (Companions and the Ahl al-Bayt (as)) and explains why the Ahl al-Bayt (as) are the best sources of Prophetic hadiths.  Read More


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4.7 Ghadīr and Arafah: The Two Last Sermons of the Prophet Arafa and Ghadīr were the two most important sermons by the Prophet Muhammad (s). The sermon of Arafa addressed the social crises to come, and Ghadīr addressed religious guidance, successorship and leadership after his demise. Read More


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4.8 Jesus and Mary in Islam Islam believes that Jesus was only a Prophet and not God Himself. Furthermore, Islam does not believe that Mary was the Mother of God. However, Islam holds both of them in high esteem and one cannot be a Muslim without believing in Jesus and Mary apostles and representatives of God on earth.  Read More


5 The Qur'an and Hadith

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5.1 Islam and Other Religions Islam makes it clear that other religions are either totally false or only partly correct due to distortions they faced. Islam does not, however, allow Muslims to disrespect or be rude to people of other faiths.   Read More


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5.2 What is the Qur’an? A Short Introduction to Islam’s Holy Book The Qur’an is a book of guidance, not an encyclopedia. It is the constitution for the salvation of mankind. On its own, it is not enough but requires teachers which are the Prophet Muhammad (s) and the Imams of his Ahl al-Bayt (as).  Read More


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5.3 The Structure of the Holy Qur’an The Qur’an was revealed gradually and divided into a 114 chapters. Each verse was revealed within a particular context. This context shows us that the Qur’an is not interested in abstract thought, but concrete applicability of religion in human life. Read More


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5.4 The Quran and Islamic law The Quran is the primary source of law. It sets the general principles (ethical and moral) of how Muslims should think and derive the law. The hadiths of the Prophet Muhammad (s) and his Ahl al-Bayt (as) are explainers of the Qur’an. Read More


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5.5 The Qur’an, Allah and Humankind The Qur’an is not just a book. The Qur’an is a relationship, As a relationship, it exists in a relational web on multiple levels. These include its relation to Allah, Islam as a religion, the Prophet, his Ahl al-Bayt (as), as well as Muslims and humanity as a whole. Read More


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5.6 Hadith and Sunnah, difference and variations The difference between hadith and Sunnah as well as the different kinds of hadiths and Sunnahs.   Read More


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5.7 The Reliability of Hadiths This lesson discusses how the reliability of hadiths are assessed by Muslim scholars. It also examines some of the basic differences between the major hadith books among Sunnis and Shias. Read More


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5.8 A Reflection on Verses of the Holy Qur’an A brief commentary on Q12:16-18 of the Holy Qur’an and how the story of Yaʿqūb (as) teaches us on how to deal with children.   Read More


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5.9 Hadith al-Thaqalayn A look at hadith al-thaqalayn and who the Ahl al-Bayt (as) are according to hadith al-mubahala.  Read More


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5.10 Imam Ali (as) and Nahj al-Balagha. A look Imam Ali’s (as) hadiths and Nahj al-Balagha, its history and importance in Islam.  Read More


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5.11 Taqlid and Tawḍih Al Masail Genre of Literature This lesson is about the importance of taqlīd and whom one can do taqlīd of. It also delves into the nature of the Tawzīh al-Masā’il genre of legal literature. Read More


6 Measuring Good and Bad in Islam

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6.1 The Effects of Our Actions in this World Sins affect our happiness in this world. They ruin our souls, but they also ruin our families and society because sinful behavior is a contagion and is transferred to others either directly or indirectly. Read More


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6.2 The Gray Areas of Islamic Law and Morality Halal and haram are clear in Islam, but mubāh (neutral permissible) and makrūh sometimes present their own difficulties as they are hard to categorize morally. This lesson looks at how categorizing them in moral terms may still be possible. Read More


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6.3 Heaven and Hell in Islam The Qur’an’s main purpose of mentioning heaven and hell is to make people conscious of their actions and know that even if others do not see what they do, Allah does. Read More


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6.4 Life and Death in Islam Life in this world is the farming field of the Hereafter. This world is a test and death marks the end of this test. Belief in the Hereafter gives meaning to people and helps them lead the proper moral life whereas unbelief inevitably leads to nihilism.   Read More


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6.5 Guidance According to Islam Guidance, or being part of the Straight Path, is not just a matter of having correct beliefs, but just as importantly, it is to lead the proper moral life which means to chose what is morally right over what is wrong and evil even if it goes against one’s selfish interests.  Read More


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6.6 Fate and the Consequences of our Choices in Islam We have limited free will in this world. Even our limited choices have consequences that are often beyond our control. However, servitude to God allows us to vastly expand our freedom of choice.   Read More


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6.7 The Effect of Culture and Environment in Shaping our Religious Choices The culture and environment affects the religious choices we make throughout our lives. However, we also have free will. Based on the circumstances we were given, Allah judges each and one of us in our own unique way. Read More


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6.8 Major Sins in Islam Islam has major and minor sins. Major sins are those which lead one to direct damnation. In this lesson, we look at four major sins, shirk, despair, disobedience to parents and murder.  Read More


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6.9 Why Allah Allows People to Sin God allows us to sin and commit evil in this world due to His having given us free will in this world. Taking away our ability to do evil would inevitably result in taking away our ability to do good. Read More


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6.10 Repentance and Forgiveness of Sins in Islam Repentance means to turn back to Allah. It is not enough to ask God for forgiveness. Full and complete repentance is to have a change in the state of one’s mind and doing one’s best to stop disobedience to Allah.  Read More


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6.11 The Three Kinds of Rights in Islam Rights are a form of responsibility in Islam. Being a Muslim is to be responsible for oneself, for others as well as one’s duties and debt to God.   Read More


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6.12 Sinning Against Others and their Delayed Punishment The worst sins are the ones we commit against others. They not only destroy our souls, but they ruin other people as well. God does not delay any of His punishments in this world, what He delays are their full punishments until the Hereafter. Read More


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6.13 Kufr in Islam Kufr in Islam isn’t simply disbelief, it is a rejection of truth whilst knowing it.  Read More


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6.14 Trivializing the Harām Our cultural assumptions are sometimes at odds with Islamic precepts. Our assumptions will tell us that a certain action is ok to do, but God in all His wisdom forbids it. Some make the presumption that God will forgive us no matter what. This tension is to be overcome by the faithful believer for he or she knows that sins are not just a matter of God forgiving or punishing us, but more so a matter of spiritual health whe... Read More


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6.15 Benefits of Islamic Law in this World Islamic law services to order our lives in this world and give us discipline. It also helps balance our lives in various areas, including family relationships as well as keeping us away from harmful activities or substances, like drinking alcohol.  Read More


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6.16 Good and Bad Deeds: The Spiritual Consequences of our Choices We need to be mindful of all of our actions. Our actions are based on choices. We cannot live without choice. Our choices either take us to God or take us away from Him. When we are distracted from God, God often allows us to suffer so that we may return to Him. Read More


7 The Legacy of the Prophet Muhammad (s) and his Ahl al-Bayt (as)

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7.1 Islam and Knowledge: the Importance of Islamic Education Knowledge and education in Islam are primarily a means to transform one’s soul and attain closeness to God. Their value does not lie in the world, but in the Hereafter. Read More


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7.2 The Ahl al-Kisa The Ahl al-Kisa are the people of the cloak, that is, the Prophet (s), Imam Ali (as), Fatima (as), Imam al-Hasan (as) and Imam al-Husayn (as) Read More


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7.3 Imamah in the Qur’an Imamah in the Qur’an is a position of divine leadership through which one guides all of mankind. Read More


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7.4 Fatima al-Zahrah (as) Fatima al-Zahra (as) was the daughter of the Prophet Muhammad (s) and wife of Imam Ali (as). All eleven of the Imams (after Imam Ali) are descendants of her. She was an avid supporter of the poor and the source of many of Islam’s great teachings. Read More


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7.5 A Brief Look at the Lives of the Imams (Imam al-Hasan until Imam Muhammad al-Baqir) A brief look at the lives of the second, third, fourth and fifth Imams. Read More


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7.6 A Brief Look at the Lives of the Imams (Imam Jafar al-Sadiq until Imam Hasan al-Askari) A brief look at the lives of the sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, tenth and eleventh Imams. Read More


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7.7 A Brief Look at the Life and Importance of Imam al-Mahdi (aj) A brief look into the life of the 12th Imam, Muhammad al-Mahdi, the reasons for his long occultation and explaining how a person can live for over a thousand years. Read More


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7.8 Salawat and Atonement in Islam The salawat is invoking God’s blessings upon the Prophet (s) and his Ahl al-Bayt (as). The salawat are a means to gaining God’s pleasure and blessings in one’s life in this world as well as the next. Read More


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7.9 The Companions (Sahaba) of the Prophet According to the Qur’an The major difference between the Shia and Sunni schools of Islam is their view of the Prophet’s companions. The Shia believe that the companions (sahaba) were mostly problematic as present in the Qur’anic narrative. The Sunni on the other hand believe that all companions were just and faithful even if they made mistakes.   Read More


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7.10 Clerical Hierarchies in Muslim Communities Clergy exist in almost all religious traditions. Islam has clerical hierarchy, however, this hierarchy is mostly based on knowledge and years of training which form the backbone of the religion's clerical hierarchy.  Read More


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7.11 Mosques in Islam Mosques have various roles in Islam, they are places of prayer, marriage, funerals and all sorts of religious activities.  Read More


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7.12 The Philosophy of Karbala and Majalis The purpose of Karbala was to instill a spiritual revolution in mankind and bring about the spiritual virtue of humility. Read More


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7.13 A Brief Biography of Imam Ali ibn Abi Talib (as) Here we briefly look at Imam Ali’s (as) biography and the qualities that distinguished him as an Imam and successor of the Prophet Muhammad (s).  Read More


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7.14 The Battle of Karbala: A Brief History Imam al-Husayn’s (as) sacrifice during the Battle of Karbala was meant to delegitimize corrupt political rule and protest the hijacking of Islam at the hands of a small but powerful and corrupt group of rulers.  Read More


8 Islamic Relationships, Sects and Conflicts

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8.1 Misconceptions about Shi’ism Among Muslims, Shias are the one group that have had the most misconceptions and false accusations leveled against it. This lesson reviews seven of the most common ones.     Read More


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8.2 Major Sects of Islam Islam, like other religions, has many sects. Some of the major sects of Islam today are Twelver (Imami) Shi’ism, Sunnism and Wahhabism. But how do we know which one is the right one?   Read More


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8.3 Islam and Religious Conflicts Religious conflicts are part of human civilization. People make the mistake to think that there is a single reason for them, whereas there are multiple reasons for them. Read More


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8.4 Islam and Rights In Islam, rights (huquq) exist in parallel with responsibilities. To speak of huquq in Islam is to speak of both rights and responsibilities. The harmonious existence of the two is what justice is all about. To transgress this balance is to sin and therefore do injustice.     Read More


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8.5 Sunnism and Shi’ism, beginnings and historical developments.  What we call Shi’ism and Sunnism today did not exist in their current form right at their inception. They are movements that went through several phases throughout history until they became what they are today.  Read More


Special Topics

9 Independent Topics

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9.1 Muslim Converts – Welcome to Islam! Being a Muslim gets you noticed. As a new Muslim, you’re a representative of the religion. Being a convert to Islam also brings about new challenges, like loneliness, despair and dealing with Muslims who give Islam a bad name.  Read More


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9.2 Basic Dos and Don’ts of Being a Muslim Converting to Islam isn’t just a change in belief, it is a change in one’s life. By practicing Islam, you and those around you will see many changes in your lifestyle. From the time you wake up to how you clean yourself, Islam changes everything.  Read More


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9.3 Halal Food and Zabiha Halal food and zabiha meat is one of the big topics in the West. Here we look at what Zabiha is and what we can do when there is no halal meat around.   Read More


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9.4 Family, Parents and Marriage in Islam Parents play central role in the religiosity and moral upbringing of their children. It is not enough to just teach them words, parents need to be active role models for the future generation.  Read More


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9.5 Marriage in Islam Healthy communities come from healthy families, and healthy families come from healthy marriages. Islam gives the blueprint to healthy marriages by setting rules, duties and responsibilities.  Read More


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9.6 Islam and Sex The two major sexual sins are zina and liwat. Zina is extramarital or premarital sex whereas liwat, a category of its own, refers to homosexual acts. Both are forbidden as they ruin people’s souls.    Read More


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9.7 Modesty in Islam Modesty is central to the religion of Islam. Both men and women need to be modest in dress and in behavior and avoid encouraging sexual attraction from people other than their spouses. Read More


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9.8 Women’s Menstruation in Islam Menstruation in Islam is a legal and not necessarily biological category. It comes with its dos and don’ts just like men’s ritual impurity. Read More


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9.9 Music, Alcohol, Drugs and Pork in Islam Islam is the strictest of all religions when it comes to the vices of alcohol, drugs, music and pork. Islam views them as spiritually polluting and to be abstained from.  Read More


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9.10 Islam and Science Is Islam and science compatible? This lesson makes a positive case for the compatibility of Islam, science and the scientific method. Read More


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9.11 A Reading List of Islamic Knowledge The most daunting of tasks is finding out where to start in learning about one’s own religion. Here we list some of the important books that Muslims in the West should read.  Read More


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9.13 Ritual Prayers and Supplications in Islam Salat are ritual prayers in Islam. Unlike some other religions, Islam makes a theoretical distinction between supplications (duʿas) and ritual prayers (salat). Here we discuss the difference between the two, and list a few important salats and duʿas.  Read More


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9.14 Death & Burial Rituals in Islam The process and significance of death rituals in Islam. In Islam, death rituals are a step by step process.  Read More


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9.15 The Battle of Armageddon: An Islamic View The major events of the end of times according to Islam and the details of the battle of Armageddon. Here the roles of the Anti-Christ, Jesus and Imam al-Mahdi will be covered.  Read More


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9.16 The Muslim Calendar The Muslim calendar is different from the Western calendar, here we look into the details of the calendar and see what makes it unique. Read More


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9.17 Muslims and non-Muslims in the Shariah Muslims must respect the laws of non-Muslim countries when they are living in them. Muslims are also not allowed to force people to convert to Islam.  Read More


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9.18 A Timeline of Major Events in Islamic History A timeline of major events in Islamic history through the eyes of the Western calendar. From the birth of the Prophet Muhammad (s) to the end of the Ottoman empire.  Read More


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9.19 Introducing the Qur’an: Why it is the way it is  The Qur’an is the revealed book of Allah. It is the foundational book of Islam and contains all the necessary principles to lead an Islamic life. The Qur’an is a unique book that needs to be understood on its own grounds.  Read More


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9.20 The School of Imam Jafar al-Sadiq Imam Jafar al-Sadiq founded the school of the Ahl al-Bayt (as). Before him, the teachings of the Ahl al-Bait (as) was more of an oral tradition, but with his coming, a systematic doctrine of pure Muhammadan Islam was born.     Read More


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9.21 Major Fields in Islamic Studies This is an review of the major fields of study in Islam, including ilm al-kalam (theology) up until akhlaq (science of spiritual ethics).  Read More


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9.22 The Caliphate in Sunni and Shia Islam The concept of a Caliph and Caliphate in Sunni Islam and how it differs from the Shia view on the matter. Read More


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9.24 Islam, Racism and Anti-Semitism  Racism, anti-Semitism or misogyny has no place in Islam. Islam believes that all human beings are honored sons and daughters of Adam (as). The only thing that makes a person superior to another in Islam is piety and righteousness. Read More


10 Islam, Religion, and Modern Controversies

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10.1 Modern Fallacies about God: where Theists and Atheists Agree Many theists today objectify God by understanding him as an object that exists along side other objects in the universe. By objectifying God, theists put the Abrahamic God on the same level as the gods of mythology* who, as an immortal but limited and contingent being, exists in the same was as Zeus would exist. This lecture observes how atheists have taken advantage of this objectified and erroneous conception of God and... Read More


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10.2 Tawhīd: The Muslim God according to the Prophet Muhammad and the Ahl al-Bayt (as)  God according to Islam is a being that transcends all of space, time, and matter. He does not exist like a galaxy or black hole would exist but is instead the source of all of existence and the grounds which gives the possibility of anything to exist in the first place. The evidence for the Muslim God’s existence is primarily logic and the consciousness of being, which science itself presupposes before it can... Read More


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10.3 God’s Existence: The Argument From Being (Wujūd) The argument from Being in demonstrating God’s existence is powerful for it does not depend on any scientific discovery or knowledge of how the universe works. It is purely based on the concept of existence which is logically prior to physical reality. Awareness of existence, especially one’s own, is the starting point in concluding that God exists. Read More


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10.4 God’s Existence: The Kalam Cosmological Argument The Kalam Cosmological Argument benefits from recent discoveries in science and thus establishes a strong case for the existence of God. Read More


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10.5 God’s Existence: The Argument From Design The argument from design states that if the world is designed, it must have a designer. That designer must be God as the originator of the universe.The argument from design states that if the world is designed, it must have a designer. Read More


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10.6 The Problem of Evil, Suffering and Pain The problem of evil is the greatest challenge to faith in God. This lesson attempts to answer both the intellectual and emotional problems of evil. Read More


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10.7 Why did God Create Us? The Purpose of our Creation Here we look at some of the reasons why God created human beings. We also look at what our purpose in this world is and why God created evil people. Read More


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10.8 Why Humans Need Religion according to Islam The purpose of religion according to Islam is to purify our souls and lead our hearts to eternal salvation. The aim of religion is to cultivate īmān , that is, a deep relationship of trust with God. Read More


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10.9 Jahl and Spiritual Ignorance in Islam The Arabic word jahl is ubiquitously used in the Qur’an but often mistranslated. Conceptually speaking, it means foolishness and ignorance of God. Read More


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10.11 Do Non-Muslims Go to Hell? Non-Muslims who are sincere and good at heart may be endowed with God’s grace and enter heaven. Non-Muslims who arrogantly reject Islam while knowing the truth may enter hell.  Read More